‘The Model Minority’: a Hinderance to the Pursuit of Justice

By Debadrita Chakraborty 

Indian immigrants fail to acknowledge their complicity in injustices both in India and America. Here’s why.

The Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement is here to stay. Catalysed by one of the most heinous racial homicide of the 21st century, BLM protests have since snowballed into one of the greatest ‘domino’ resistance movement in the U.S. The sustained nature of the movement and its organised approach towards decolonising the Global North’s white washed history and curriculum have resonated with other minority and racially targeted communities who have expressed solidarity by not only dissenting against institutional racism and police brutalities but also reflecting on their own complicity in anti-black racism. However, one of the most visible and prominent minority group that has remained relatively apolitical in a deeply political time despite its history of colonial oppression and state sanctioned hostile policing is the Indian migrant community in America.

Continue reading “‘The Model Minority’: a Hinderance to the Pursuit of Justice”

Technology: Tool or Barrier to Access to Justice

By Louis Dejeu-Castang

“The introduction of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO) together with local authority funding cuts has created an adverse environment which has resulted in half of the law centres or agencies offering free legal advice being closed”[1]. This striking statistic highlights the severity of the crisis facing access to justice in the UK. It highlights a void wherein the vital legal information, that used to be supplied by law centres, is no longer reaching those that need it most. To many, access to justice is now considered a luxury as opposed to a human right. However, technology, in spite of its power to connect, has several attributes that make it seem a poor tool for rectifying this problem. Continue reading “Technology: Tool or Barrier to Access to Justice”

How casteist is the Coronavirus pandemic? 

By Anmol Ratan 

History bears testimony to the fact that unlike most of the world, India is not new to practice of social distancing. Maintaining social as well as physical distance has been historically entrenched in various form of isolation by the upper castes in the Hindu social order ever since the Vedic times[i]. Based on the religion of Hinduism and its scriptures, social distancing, which today is claimed to be the only curative measure for COVID-19, has always been used as a socially-sanctioned weapon of mass social disruption and collective discrimination against the lower castes and Dalits in the Indian subcontinent. It has been a part of India’s unjust history and continues to be a reality even in India’s fight against coronavirus.

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